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Description

Get fat without gaining weight.

Don’t waste the precious turns you’ve earned—make the most of them with the Black Diamond Drift Ski. With its lightweight construction, early-rise tip, and fat 100mm waist, the Drift hauls up the skin track, turns quickly in tight chutes, and still has the cojones to send the downhill like your favorite pow stick.
  • Formula One Technology uses three internal ribs to transmit power to the ski
  • Early-rise tip for easy turning and maximum float in deep conditions
  • Flat tails easily sink in snow at camp or when building snow anchors
  • Carbon fiber reinforcements between the core and base add rigidity and pop to your turns

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Black Diamond Drift Ski

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Here's what others have to say...

Unanswered Question

Any recommendations regarding these vs....

Posted on

Any recommendations regarding these vs. the BD Aspect? I know the aspect is narrower/ a bit better on hardpack, but I having a lot of trouble making up my mind.

4 5

no tip/tail holes?

good ski. handled my 6'1 210 frame pretty well. I made the mistake of getting the 186 cm size when I'm not the most experienced skier; that was the main reason I parted with these: wrong size. The only problem I had with the design and build quality was the fact that there aren't any pre-drilled holes for pre-drilled skins or for rigging rescue sleds and better anchor utilization. Like I said, I'm not a super experienced skier, but I was hoping to have those features at my disposal once I was comfortable enough to head out in the backcountry.

5 5

Hell of a ski

Skied these today after mounting them with my Dynafits last night. Despite having done no additional tuning out of the box and just a quick hot wax, these skis are great. Snow varied between excellent powder, wind affected snow, dust on crust, and breakable crust. The Drifts preformed very well (or as well as can be expected in variable conditions). If you like to make quick turns in trees with the occasional GS arc in a thin glade, this is a great ski for you. This ski is light, skins well, and is just flat out fun to ski.

Hell of a ski

I am new to Telemarking and new to backcountry...

Posted on

I am new to Telemarking and new to backcountry skiing, but really would like to upgrade my setup. I have some decade old super thin K2 skis with Chili bindings that I don't mind, but the skis are too damn thin for any amount of powder. I will mostly be using them in the backcountry, but really don't know enough about skis. These are the right price, but I don't mind waiting and shopping a bit. Also, I'm 6'2" and 215 pounds. Any recs? Thanks!

Responded on

These look like solid performers for what you want to do, but I'd go a step wider personally. I have the Amperage (115 under foot), and I am happy with them other than going through the crud. The Zealot from BD sounds like a solid choice to me as it is a bit wider, similar in weight (so light), but do everything. If you were to go outside the BD line, I'd suggest something like the 4FRNT EHP as they charge through everything, but they are a bit heavier. Good luck!

Unanswered Question

As much as would like to pretend that I...

Posted on

As much as would like to pretend that I get in the back country more than I do - what I'm really looking for is a solid all mountain ski that can hold an edge on hard pack but I can take into the back bowls at Vail and bust up the deep stashes without having work the turn too much. I'm an advance Telemann but not expert anymore - not much cartilage left in my knees to crush the bumps - unless there's a foot of new snow on them. Any recommendations for ski / telebinding setups??

4 5

Good powder ski for beginners to intermediates

The Drifts are great light weight powder skis... but ride them in anything but the fluffiest of powder and you might feel like they are lacking power.
Pros: Light weight, responsive, quick turning
Cons: Too soft- not for more aggressive skiers
I find these skis are great for their lightness and responsiveness but overall I would not buy them again. I am an advanced skier (used to ski instruct) and I like to ski aggressively. I find the skis too soft for my style of skiing and I would only recommend them for beginner to intermediate skiers. I guess I should have known given that they are so light but I was being optimistic in hoping I could find an all around great ski.
Location: Revelstoke, BC

No Fall Terrain

No Fall Terrain

Posted on

Dani navigates the La Banana couloir with ease, Las Lenas, Argentina.

I am going to learn to Telemark ski this...

Posted on

I am going to learn to Telemark ski this winter. I will start by taking lessons at the resort. Is this a good ski to learn on? Also the guy at the shop said i should get this in the 176. as a beginner would i be better off on 166's?. I weigh 140#. Thanks

Responded on

It may depend on how solid/aggressive an alpine skier you are. That said, I would lean toward the 166cm.

Responded on

Seems like a good beginner board. It's soft and forgiving and turns easily. I think it's fat enough you can go short and be fine.

Best of luck with the tele turns!

Hello, I am 140 pounds, I am an expert...

Posted on

Hello, I am 140 pounds, I am an expert skier ( CSIA level 3)...I am not sure about the size...should I go for 166cm or 176 cm ??

Responded on

Depends on your height. Don't get a ski much taller than you, especially for your weight. Aim for a ski about your height +/- a few cm.

Dropping in hot!

Dropping in hot!

Posted on

Dani floats into a big easy turn with confidence on the Drifts, below Pyramidal in the Cerro Catedral backcountry.

Pond Skimming on the BD Drift!

Posted on

This ski sucks for pond skimming, or maybe I just suck at pond skimming.

5 5

Great fun.....

on soft snow and will take you farther than you might think on the groomed. Awesome in the typical chopped up snow on big/deep days when everyone beats you to the best stash. For a soft snow area in and out of bounds great ski. Not the amazing powder ski but not bad either as a one quiver fat ski.

5 5

BD Drift - Sweet for the deep

Unlike most ski reviewers here, I am OLD school ( started skiing in the '60's) and have very slowly moved up to fatter skis. This is the fattest ski I own. Unfortunately I am only weekend skier and had an accident last Fall that hurt my early season skiing. So the photo below was my first great powder to on these skis. And they were awesome. Even though I have them mounted Tele, I mostly quit dropping the knee about 2 decades ago. I can proudly call myself a Tele skier again. I can drop a knee with confidence now, no Tele tip dive. Even open it up and rip some Big turns.
I did not get these out till about mid season, just as the Wasatch was getting some rain and weekend after weekend of wind. I did not do so well on wind scoured and crusts. But I won't blame the skis, but they did feel a bit grabby.

What size skins do I get for these skis?

Posted on

What size skins do I get for these skis?

Responded on

I agree the ascensions are a great skin choice, but you don't need the 140. The 125 will work perfectly. The ski has a ton of tip rocker, and is only 100mm undefoot. No sense paying more for all that extra skin material just to trim it off later. You generate the most traction from the rear 2/3 of the ski. And on the ski, especially with so much of the tip in the air, even in deeper snow, you will still have full coverage in the tail and underfoot. 125 is the way to go.

What width skin would work best with these...

Posted on

What width skin would work best with these skis - the 186 cm (138-100-123)

Responded on

You really only need and use the plush under foot so 100cm would work.

Responded on

I am a noobie so I am a bit hesitant to disagree w/ Noah Howell, but recently I was skinning up and had to traverse in a few places on tracked show. This caused the edges of my skis to be the main contact points with the snow and I was slipping a ton because my skins were too narrow for my ski. I can't imagine why you wouldn't want your skin to cover as much of the ski as possible to give you lots of traction. I would go with the widest measurement.

5 5

Turn and Burn

This ski epitomizes the new ski revolution with a rockered tip and lots of side cut. There have been questions about the flex but the ski is to be skied using the side cut laterally and not pushing on the tip. Old schoolers want press on the tip and drive the ski. You don't have to do that with this ski. It floats in powder, light for hiking and is at home on the groomers. The ski is made for the new style boots that are laterally stiff and offer softer forward flex. This ski really performs with a equally balanced center stance. Look and goes where you are looking on a dime without the need for any effort. I am a short swing skiing powder junkie.

Responded on

Have you any experience with the k2 Coomback? I'm trying to decide between these and the Drift. I'm 5'5" 130 pounds, and a good tele skier. Looking for a nice, floaty powder hog.

Responded on

William, I have not tried the Coomback. I think you should demo both skis. I don't think they will ski the same. The Drift is much lighter than the Coomback.

4 5

Gotta treat 'em like an ugly child. You'll learn to love 'em

My initial impression about the Black Diamond Drift is that they are soft and hooky. In fact, I didn't really like them all that much. The skis were constantly throwing me into the back seat, and once that was accomplished, they would take off out of control. This mainly occured only in rough terrain... while in powder the Drift skied like a dream.

Basically, they like to turn, and despite their width, they can turn fast, tight and on a dime just was well as they slarve wide sweepers. But if you hold a turn for too long, those wide tails will hook you. You have to stay on top of these skis as they are not forgiving of mistakes.

But all of the above only applies to variable snow, chopped powder and hardpack conditions. In deep, untracked snow (which, honestly is what we're skiing in the backcountry 90% of the time) the Drift are floaty, whippy and fun.

The light weight makes them feel very nice on the skin track. I used the new Fritchi Freeride Pro bindings on them, and sliding in the uptrack for hours on end was made easier than previous touring setups I've owned. The wide tip was especially nice when breaking trail. The metal skin clip on the tail is also a nice touch.

4 5

Not a big mountain board but killer all-mountain touring ski

I will preface this review by saying that I haven't skied a ski like this for years. First off I was really drawn to the Drift by the features 100 under foot, great sidecut, early rise tips, light and stiff thanks to use of carbon in the construction. Seriously these will hold their own on any groomed/hard slope, and are certainly adequate for powder. Here is my problem, I am used to fatter skis with less sidecut and apparently I still prefer fatter and less sidecut. These felt really hooky in variable terrain. I am not used to this as my alpine pow skis have tapered tips (Aramada JJ's, ARG's). Then there is the mounting point factor. The factory rec. mounting point is 10cm back from center, all my alpine skis range from 5-7cm back. This is what I think was really throwing me off in really technical jump turn like chutes. The soft tips grab and drive you back onto what I would consider really stiff tails. I basically felt thrown into the backseat on every turn, so I had to adjust my style a bit. All in all these are great skis if you are shooting for a light weight one ski touring quiver. I will say that they carve really nicely. On the groomer they were snappy edge to edge and didn't feel like they have a speed limit. I however think I will be considering the BD Zealot as a replacement, a bit wider, less side-cut, and I don't mide hauling an extra pound or two around if it means more stoke on the down. I would definitely consider mounting them a bit farther forward if you aren't used to "traditional" mounting points.

Not a big mountain board but killer all-mountain touring ski

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