Top Brands SaleTop Brands Sale
Choosing Bivy Sacks

A bivy sack is a low-profile, waterproof barrier for your sleeping bag that offers an ultra-lightweight alternative to traditional tents. Originally used by climbers who needed lightweight, compact shelters for multi-day ascents, they are also popular among backcountry minimalists who want to shave weight. They don't offer room to move, but they're easy to pack.

Structured Bivy Sacks
Structured bivy sacks, called bivy shelters, have small suspension systems that expand the head area to provide some room to sit up in. This makes the confined space more comfortable fit.
Related Content Leave Your Tent Behind: Alternatives to Traditional Camping
Bivy Openings
The most basic bivy sacks have an opening at the head to let you breathe and allow moisture to escape. More advanced models use mesh panels to keep bugs out.
Related Content How to Choose the Right Camping Sleep System
Bivy Fabrics
Most bivy sacks use two different fabrics to balance protection and weight. The bottom fabric is heavier for durability. The upper fabric is usually lighter and features a waterproof/breathable laminate.
Related Content Tips for Choosing a Campsite

How to Choose a Snowboard Jacket

 

Your snowboard jacket should keep you dry when you’re riding wet, sloppy snow, breathe enough that you don’t sweat hard when you’re riding hard, and be warm enough that you don’t freeze on the way up the lift for another lap. Most people will want a powder skirt to keep out the snow. Insulation, venting, helmet-compatible hoods, pockets, fit, and fabric choices come down to what’s best for your riding style.

Waterproof Rating:

A jacket’s waterproof rating tells you how well its fabric, membrane, and seam construction protect you from wet weather. Look for a higher waterproof rating (20k+) if you spend lots of time in stormy weather or in a wet climate like the Pacific Northwest.

Features:

Generally, most snowboarders want a powder skirt to keep the snow out and venting to help them stay cool. A jacket designed for resorts will have features focused on comfort or convenience whereas a jacket designed for the minimalist or backcountry snowboarder will keep things simple to save weight.

Insulation:

Heavily insulated jackets are inherently warm and can be worn over minimal layering. Jackets without insulation require extra mid layers or an insulation layer, but they allow you the flexibility to dress down on warmer days.