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  • Big Agnes - Copper Spur UL2 Tent: 2-Person 3-Season -

Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 Tent: 2-Person 3-Season

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4.5510

10 Reviews

Details

Travel fast and light, and then sleep like a baby.

Don't travel with a house on your back—instead, check out the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 2-Person 3-Season Tent, which has basically all the household features you're used to but weighs around three pounds. Maybe "basically all" is exaggerating, but the Copper Spur does have two large doors and vestibules, individual media pockets with cord routing, and reflective guylines, all features that your house doesn't even have. Your house also doesn't have a PU-coated, silicone-treated fly and floor, or polyester mesh walls that keep out bugs but let you enjoy cool summer breezes and crystal-clear night skies.

The Copper Spur's fully taped seams seal out water, and the two-pole hub system is easy to set up and tear down, thanks to DAC Twist Clips and quick cross-pole design that also gives you tons of headroom. This tent is made for 3-season camping, but if you're heading out for a summer trip and would prefer to go even lighter, you can grab the footprint and fly and leave the tent body behind, trimming weight down to just over two pounds. There's an optional gear loft, too—we'd like to see the house that has that.

  • Polyester mesh walls
  • Nylon ripstop fly and floor with PU and silicone coatings
  • Fully taped seams
  • 2 doors with vestibules
  • 2-pole DAC Featherlite hub pole design
  • Individual media pockets with cord routing
  • Reflective guylines and corner webbing
  • Footprint and gear loft sold separately
  • Item #BAG001G

Tech Specs

Material
[fly] nylon ripstop, PU coating (1200mm), [body] nylon, polyester mesh, [floor] nylon ripstop, PU coating (1200mm)
Capacity
2-person
Season
3-season
Wall Type
double
Freestanding
yes
Poles
DAC Featherlite NSL aluminum, DAC Featherlite NFL aluminum
Number of Poles
2
Pole Attachment
DAC H Clip, DAC Twist Clip, hub
Number of Doors
2
Number of Vestibules
2
Vestibule Space
[each] 9 sq ft
Ventilation
mesh ceiling panels
Seams
fully taped
Gear Loft
yes, sold separately
Interior Height
42 in
Floor Dimensions
90 x 52 - 42 in
Floor Space
29 sq ft
Packed Size
5.5 x 17.5 in
Fast-pitch Option
yes, footprint not included
Fast-pitch Weight
2 lb 1 oz
Trail Weight
2 lb 13 oz
Packed Weight
3 lb 2 oz
Recommended Use
ultralight backpacking, camping, backpacking
Manufacturer Warranty
lifetime

Tech Specs

  • Reviews
  • Q & A

What do you think about this product?

Have questions about this product?

Don't Fall for the Hype

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I recently bought the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 and took it out on a 30 day backpacking trip in the No. Cascades of WA. Being my 35th backpacking trip, with thousands of trail miles under my boots and hundreds of nights out in all types of weather, I feel I'm well qualified to objectively evaluate backcountry equipment. Here's my assessment of this tent. I'll also tell you right off the bat not to fall for the hype surrounding it. I did. And I was sorry.

First, there are a few positives I should point out. This tent is lightweight, freestanding, has nice headroom, and is easy to set up. But anyone can do that. And that is where the positives end.

Unfortunately, the list of negatives is long:

1. The ventilation is horrible. Even with the vent open, unless you are able to fully roll back all 4 fly doors, condensation is a real problem. Some mornings, even with the fly doors unzipped pretty far from both the top and bottom, the mesh ceiling was totally soaked and water was dripping on us and our bags. The lower walls of the tent were usually wet from condensation and that made our sleeping bags wet in the morning from rubbing up against them during the night. I even had this problem during the first 2 weeks while I was out solo before my wife joined me. Once there were 2 of us inside, the problem got worse. And although it only happened once during the 30 days, if you wake up in the middle of the night with the rain blowing in the vent, be prepared to have to go outside in that storm to close the vent because there is no access from the inside.

2. The rain that fell on the fly barely beaded up at all. It mainly just saturated it.

3. The tent door design is poor. With the door open we found ourselves oftentimes either stepping or kneeling on it because it lays on the ground. Although you can push your way under the fly door if you have to, it is also difficult to zip/unzip the doors all the way to the sides without pulling back both fly doors. During a quick entry/exit in a rainstorm it is not a good situation.

4. The flap on the fly is extremely flimsy and when it is wet it will often get stuck in the fly zipper.

5. It’s ridiculous that someone would design a seam in the floor of the tent. How about 1 piece?

6. The guy out line sliders are really chintzy.

7. It is a little narrow for 2 people. It is more like a nice 1½ person tent.

8. The tent poles are very fragile. I put my lightweight Polartec pants and vest on top of the tent and it bowed from just that little weight. And small gusts of wind caused the tent to bow, even with it tightly and securely guyed out in solid grou. There is no way this tent should be called a 3 season tent. To me, 3 season means shoulder season. And shoulder season means the possibility of snow. I seriously doubt this tent could withstand anything more than a couple of inches of snow. I do not know that for an absolute fact, but fortunately I didn’t have to find out for sure this time.

9. After just this one trip, the bottom walls of the tent are already fraying where the zipper is sewn to them.

10. The tent stakes are really cheap and I took my own Y-stakes from my Mtn. Hardwear tent.

11. The tent is already expensive and you have to buy the ridiculously priced $70 footprint extra.

While out for the month I happened to run into a couple others who had the same tent and also voiced some of the same complaints. Luckily we could return the tent. And when we did, the salesperson told us she heard a lot of negatives about the tent before and that is why she didn’t buy it.

With all things considered, I have a suggestion for the B.A. design team. If you want to charge top dollar for a tent and footprint, how about you quit playing around with that stupid mtnGLO crap, and instead focus your attention on designing a quality tent that's actually worth the money you charge for it. If this is what B.A. is content to put their name on these days, I won’t need to look at their products again.

Great Tent!

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

We took this on its maiden voyage and more or less, it held up great! Overall a good product with no major problems. It is lightweight and set up and packs away very quickly. The design, construction, and materials are sturdy. The rain fly definitely needs the additional tautness provided by the ground stakes to effectively wick moderate rain.

Awesome tent

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Big Agnes has always delivered when it comes to super light weight tents. This is another great one. Super light, pretty roomy for its size, awesome. Ive used it for everything for a long time, and I love it. my old one was stolen, and just picked up a new one. Buy it.

Should be Gold Spur

  • Familiarity: I gave it as a gift but have feedback to share

I got this tent for my cousin who will be spending the summer backpacking around Southeast Asia; after he had spent months researching tents, and finally settling on this one, The weight of this tent paired with the features is what got him, and the first time he took it out he could not have been more stoked. He put the tent, tarp, and fly in a compression sack and was able to get them to the size of a large grape-fruit. Great tent for anyone looking for something light-weight and packable.

Big Ag in Columbia

I have been using the UL3 Copper Spur for a couple years now and love it. I purchased the UL2 for a friend to use while backpacking around South America. Here it is in Columbia

Big Ag in Columbia

Great Features, Good Interior Space

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I took this out over the weekend for the first time, and think it is going to be a solid investment for my future outdoor endeavors. I'd never seen a pole system quite like this one, but it was a breeze to set up. It amazes me that it is a freestanding tent and is still this light! Can't wait to get out and use it more.

Favorite tent

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

There's a reason that when a student put their knife through my first Copper Spur 2, that I immediately went back to buy another. Super lightweight, easy to set up and take down, and it breathes great. Definitely a bit cozy for 2 people, so you shouldn't mind being close to your tent-mate.

Over 4000 miles and 250+ nights!!!

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Still going strong! My wife and I have a previous model in this tent. It is perfect. We love it so much we also own the 3 man and 1 man but those don't get used much. We usually use a very thin homemade ground cloth (tyvek kite making material) with it but not always. One of the zippers doesn't zip as well as it used to but it still works fine. I have never cleaned the zipper but might try if it gets worse. Also, we always just stuff the tent in our pack. We never fold it up nicely before packing away. This and only a couple other items we use have lasted this long.

Less Than A Year Old And It Leaks

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Took this tent camping this weekend. Fairly moderate to heavy rains and my down bag did not appreciate the water coming in during the night. We'll see how Big Agnes responds to my warranty claim. The tent was purchased in May of 2014 and has been use on approximately 8-10 Boy Scout weekend outings.

Best, most balanced tent we've ever used

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is a fantastic tent. It's really the best balance between comfort, weight, and price that we've ever used. You can get a tent that's lighter, cheaper, or bigger (more comfortable), but no tent balances all those aspects like the copper spur. It's light enough that you can take it on long backpacking trips. It's big enough that 2 people will have plenty of room, and with 2 doors and vestibules you won't be crawling over each other to get in and out and will have plenty of space to store your gear. It won't break the bank either. Another great feature is that it is truly freestanding and doesn't require to be staked out unlike other ultralight tents (Big Agnes Fly Creek, NEMO Hornet, or REI Dash).

Truly one of the best tents we've ever used!

For a more in depth review, please check out our website!http://backcountrygeareview.com/2015/04/16/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul2/

To see how it compares to other backpacking tents out there:http://backcountrygeareview.com/2015/03/23/backpacking-tent-review/

love it

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

i really dig this tent. it was time to retire my Kelty Vortex 2 and go for something lighter yet freestanding. i find this tent to fit that bill wonderfully. the setup is easy. all the mesh is great. it would be nice if the mesh went a little lower so i could see out at ground level without sitting up, but no big deal. the interior pockets are fantastic and there are tieout points on the interior that make a great place for a mini clothesline to hang the socks at night. the way the doors are designed it makes it a little more difficult to get all the debris out in the morning when i turn the tent upside down and shake it out. also, along with the door design, i am careful that the door always falls to the inside of the tent otherwise it might take a knee in the dirt if it fall to the outside of the tent. i find that there is enough room for me and my girlfriend (and we're not snuggling in 80 degrees with 80% humidity!). the tent does indeed weigh 3lbs 2oz with all the included stuff but the footprint weighs 7.5 oz (on my scale) bringing the total to over 3.5lbs. not a big deal to me, but may be a deal breaker to others. the tent is great and i recommend it to someone looking for a freestanding lightweight tent.

How many guy points does this tent have? I am interested in finding an ultralight backpacking tent that I could also use for summer mountaineering so good weather resistance is a must. Thanks.

What is the difference between Packaged Weight, Trail Weight and Fast Pitch Weight (Fast Fly Weight as Big Agnes calls it).



Also what does the footprint weigh?

Here is how Big Agnes defines the different weights for their tents:



Packed weight:

This is the heaviest you can expect your tent to weigh, straight out of the box or from the store. This weight refers to all packaging, hang tags, as well as the stuff sacks, fly, body, stakes, poles, and guy lines.



Trail weight:

This is the lightest you can expect your tent to weigh, stripped of everything but the essentials. This number reflects the weight of just the fly (no guy lines), body, and poles.



Fast-fly weight:

This is the weight of your fly, footprint and poleset only.



Copper Spur UL2 info:



Packed Weight - 3lb 2 oz (50 oz) or 1420grams

Trail Weight - 2lb 13 oz (45 oz) or 1270grams

Fast Fly Weight - 2lb 1 oz (33oz) or 935grams

Footprint Weight - 5 oz or 142grams



Anytime you have a Big Agnes question, shoot me an email and I'll make sure to work with you 1-on-1!



Jared D.

Expert Gearhead

801.736.4336

jdowns@backcountry.com

Hi, Jared. I am deciding between the BA Copper Spur and the Nemo Dagger . The trail weight of the the Dagger is listed as almost a pound heavier. Just wondering...is this an apples to apples comparison or are they using different criteria? Any significant differences between the two tents? I find it hard to compare fabric strength because they use different wording there. Your thoughts on durability comparison? Thanks for your time.

wheres the stats on this tent?

Hey Robert Corcoran,



Minimum trail weight: 2 lbs. 12 oz.

Fly / footprint pitch weight: 2 lbs. 1 oz.

Packaged weight: 3 lbs. 2 oz.

Packed size: 5.5 x 17.5 inches

Floor dimensions: 90 x 52 (foot width) 42 inches

Floor area: 29 square feet

Vestibule area: 9 + 9

Peak height: 42 inches

Number of doors: 2 doors

Number of poles: 1 double hubbed poleset + 1 cross pole

Pole material: Aluminum DAC Featherlite NSL

Pole diameter: 9.0 millimeters

Canopy fabric: Nylon/polyester mesh

Floor fabric: Coated ripstop nylon

Rainfly fabric: Coated ripstop nylon

Footprint included: No

Ultralight: Yes

Design type: Freestanding

I'm struggling to decide which tent I'm...

I'm struggling to decide which tent I'm after. Originally I wanted a light tent for 2 people and was leaning towards the BA Angel Spring UL3, as I wasn't looking for an ultra minimalist option and liked the larger area especially for extended trips. However, I'm now thinking the tent I choose is probably going to be half 2p and half solo and am thinking it seems silly to lug around a 3person tent for solo activities. So I'm torn between the BA Copper Spur UL2, and the Angle Spring UL2 or UL3 as something that could do double duty as a 1 or 2p tent. Part of my issue is, while I am wanting to cut weight (my current and only tent is a 3p and weights 5.5lbs) I'm still tantalized by the floor space in the angel spring UL3... at only 4ounces more than the copper spur UL2 you get approximately 50% more floor space and still near vertical sidewalls which would be appealing for use with 2people



I realize the Angel spring series is pretty new and there is almost no reviews on them, but I'm curious if anyone has a first had comparison between the copper spur series and the angel spring series.

Best Answer

I don't have experience with these tents specifically, but I'll comment on the big difference I see - pole configuration. I'm a big fan of the X pole design over the more complex, multisized pole configs. They are easy to setup even in the dark, easy to repair, and just plain simple! When size and weight are relatively similar I'll go X pole all day long.