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Description

Just you and your tent.

Backpacking's all about solitude, so ditch the office, the crowds, and the hangers-on and head up into the mountains with just you, yourself, and the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1 1-Person 3-Season Tent. It's an ultralight backpacker's dream, weighing in at 2.5 pounds fully packed, and nearly a pound lighter if you opt to bring just the poles, fly and footprint (available here) for a quick-set up option. The Copper Spur is made primarily of polyester mesh to keep things light, airy, and breathable, and the ripstop nylon fly has a double waterproof coating and fully-taped seams to keep rain and condensation at bay. It has a handy vestibule, too, which has plenty of room to shelter your boots and pack.

To keep things lighter than a mint julep, Big Agnes designed the Spur with a DAC Featherlite hub pole system, which is super-easy to set up and reduces weight by eliminating the need for 3 or 4 poles. They did throw in a single crosspiece, though, to give you plenty of headroom to keep claustrophobia out of the picture. In fact, the Spur has more headroom than most similarly-sized tents, thanks to a steep wall design that lets you sit up without having to jam your head into the roof of your tent, which might not sound that special, but is a big deal when you're spending extended amounts of time on the trail. There's a media pocket with a cord port, too, as well as reflective guylines and webbing that make it easy to navigate your campsite by headlamp—and hey, even if you do trip and munch on a mouthful of dirt, at least there won't be anyone around to see.

  • Ultralight 2-pole hub design
  • Featherlight DAC aluminum poles
  • Single door and vestibule
  • Steep wall design for extra headroom
  • Media pocket with cord port
  • 3 mesh pockets
  • Reflective guylines and corner webbing
  • Gear loft and footprint sold separately

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Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1 Tent 1-Person 3-Season

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

Fantastic, well balanced tent

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

We used a Copper Spur UL2, but this one is so similar that the review is also applicable!

This is a fantastic tent. It's really the best balance between comfort, weight, and price that we've ever used. You can get a tent that's lighter, cheaper, or bigger (more comfortable), but no tent balances all those aspects like the copper spur. It's light enough that you can take it on long backpacking trips. The major difference between the UL2 and UL1 (other than size and weight obviously) is that the UL1 has 1 door and 1 vestibule compared to the UL2's 2 doors and 2 vestibules. This should work fine though as you're only using it for 1 person. You won't fit 2 people in this tent. It won't break the bank either. Another great feature is that it is truly freestanding and doesn't require to be staked out unlike other ultralight tents (Big Agnes Fly Creek, NEMO Hornet, or REI Dash).

Truly one of the best tents we've ever used!

For a more in depth review, please check out our website!http://backcountrygeareview.com/2015/04/16/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul2/

To see how it compares to other backpacking tents out there:http://backcountrygeareview.com/2015/03/23/backpacking-tent-review/

5 5

Awesome little tent.

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I have in the past owned a Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight, a Zpacks CF tarp, a Zpacks Hexamid and a BA Fly Creek UL2 and this beats all of them by a mile. It is super easy to pitch. Has side entry door so you don't have to crawl over everything when enteringt and also the rain doesn't dump all over you or the inside of your tent when you get up or go out. I love it.

What is the difference between Packaged Weight, Trail Weight and Fast Pitch Weight (Fast Fly Weight as Big Agnes calls it).

Also what does the footprint weigh?

Best Answer Responded on

Here is how Big Agnes defines the different weights for their tents:

Packed weight:
This is the heaviest you can expect your tent to weigh, straight out of the box or from the store. This weight refers to all packaging, hang tags, as well as the stuff sacks, fly, body, stakes, poles, and guy lines.

Trail weight:
This is the lightest you can expect your tent to weigh, stripped of everything but the essentials. This number reflects the weight of just the fly (no guy lines), body, and poles.

Fast-fly weight:
This is the weight of your fly, footprint and poleset only.

Copper Spur UL1 info:

Packed Weight - 2lb 8 oz (40 oz) or 1130grams
Trail Weight - 2lb 3 oz (35 oz) or 992grams
Fast Fly Weight - 1lb 10 oz (26oz) or 737grams
Footprint Weight - 4 oz or 113grams

Anytime you have a Big Agnes question, shoot me an email and I'll make sure to work with you 1-on-1!

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

Responded on

Jared,
Would you upgrade the stakes on this tent to MSR groundhogs?

5 5

As Advertised

It creates huge room in your pack. It weighs nothing and it provides protection against the weather. This tent is expensive - no doubt - but take it from someone who has bought cheap gear and regretted when the rain hit -- this tent is worth for backpackers looking to reduce weight but not compromise quality against the elements.

Spacious Vestibule!

Spacious Vestibule!

Under that garbage bag is an Osprey Ariel 75 pack and a pair of boots. Plenty of space to cover your gear but still easy to enter & exit the tent.

Heart Lake, Mallard Larkins, ID

Heart Lake, Mallard Larkins, ID

The Copper Spur at Heart Lake. A mountain goat with two kids walked by right after I took this photo, sadly I could not get the tent & the goats in frame together - I just guess we'll have to go back next year :)

Sunset in Murray, ID

Sunset in Murray, ID

1st night out with the Copper Spur UL1. I pitched it over my LuxuryLite Mesh Cot. Mild weather so I staked 3 of the corners and the vestibule. Worked well, slept comfortably.

You can see the survival blanket I threw over the cot before the tent sticking out in the lower left of the pic, not sure if it reflected any heat back or not, I'll try it without next time.

Responded on

Awesome picture Erin !!!

I selected this image to feature on the homepage of Backcountry.com in our Activity Feed! Congrats on being GOATWORTHY !!!

I've been trying to determine the difference...

I've been trying to determine the difference in last year's vs. this year's models. I see a shaving of a measly few ounces, but have there been any other improvements? I can't find a side-by-side comparison, and I'm trying to rationalize making the plunge for the fancy new one. :)

Responded on

Hey Beth,

The biggest difference between this year and last years tents are the DAC Featherlite poles that have a greater strength to weight ratio and a more environmental anodizing process.

Does this new model have the second zip...

Does this new model have the second zip half-door to allow you to reach boots or a water bottle under the back of the tent the way an earlier version did?

Responded on

It does not. It was deleted two version back to lose weight.

RISE n SHINE !

RISE n SHINE !

Looking out at the La Sal range in Moab during a backcountry.com trip down south to visit Outerbike!

5 5

Love it.

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used this tent for the much of the last two years solo backpacking, except in winter.

It's so small and light packed down it's quite amazing.

Setup has always been super fast, in the dark, in bad weather, etc.

No functional/durability issues to report so far, it's been pitched on mud, rocks, whatever.

I mainly wanted to get in a good review since another reviewer decided to give 1-star based on price, which has nothing to do with the product.

I am 6'1/170lbs, and when elevated on a pad (I use an Exped UL most of the time) I do just barely fit head to toe without almost rubbing one or the other on the side of the tent. I wouldn't mind another 2-3 inches in length... but it's not a big deal.

Attaching a couple photos of it last winter out in the snow (which was unexpected, and unpleasant). I did have to build some wind barriers to protect it and keep snow from blowing up under the fly, but that's why it's a 3-season tent!

Love it.

I am 6'3". Can I fit comfortably in this...

I am 6'3". Can I fit comfortably in this tent without my head and feet being cramped?

Best Answer Responded on

Hey T-Rav,

You will have an extra 15 inches difference between your height the the length of the floor. So an extra 7 inches for your head and 7 inches for your feet and with a fairly generous wall angle you should have a reasonable amount of room to roll around before you start bumping your head.

Responded on

I have this tent. I'm 6'2''. I'm using a long bag. This tent is 90" long, grommet to grommet (this is how the industry measures tents). The inside dimension depends if you stake it or not. I used a good old tape measure and here are the inside measurements of my tent in "free standing" set up 85" long, 40" head, 28" feet, 38" peak. There is a slant at the feet and the usable length is about 82"

Responded on

Cri, do your feet or head touch the tent? I'm 6'2" and don't think I really fit. I haven't actually taken the tent on a trip yet, just laid in it set up in my yard. I'm worried. My free-standing outside dimension is only about 85.5". I thought I'd be okay because I fit in the Lone Stream. But the Copper Spur is clearly smaller. The problem is, what would I buy instead if I returned it?

5 5

Pre-2013 Version

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I have the older version of this tent and love it. I've been backpacking for decades including two trips > 500 miles and many many 50-100 miles trips in California, Washington, Alaska, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, North Carolina and TN. I was an Army Ranger while in the military so I've spent literally years of my life living in everything from swamps to desert, mountains etc..etc... Every shelter has it's place. This one for me hits the right balance of weight/coverage/ease of use and durability. My style of hiking is not to spend a lot of time in camp but when I'm there I don't want to be adjusting and playing with my shelter. I want to put it up and have a home against the elements. This design is big enough in a one-man shelter to give you room to lounge and it has enough pole coverage to not have large unsupported areas of fabric that sag against the inner. It doesn't take a lot of space to pitch and it isn't highly dependent upon stakes to form it's shape. There are lighter shelters out there but all of them have some sort of compromise in one shape or form. I'm very happy with this choice and if you spend any amount of time in the outdoors, the price is forgotten quickly.