Gear Review

5 5

Why take more?

OK...in truth I've never used this bag. I only wish I'd taken it to Denali when I was old enough (young enough) to enjoy it! The "-40" bag I used to climb Denali (one of Earth's coldest environs) was a shadow of this bag. That was 1980 and I didn't know about Western at that time. This bag is astoundingly thick and warm for its 3 lbs. 4 oz. By most accounts, most users of this bag will swear that it's good to -40. Certainly with a tent I would have no question about that. The shell is surprisingly water resistant. Buy the Gore version if you want the ultimate in warmth and water resistance for snow caves and igloos. The inside of the foot section is slightly burlier fabric for placement of boot liners or full boots that have frozen to your feet. (happened to me!) By the way, this is not licence to crawl into your bag with crampons in place! Want the maximum in warmth/weight/compressibility? You're looking at it.

Responded on

If you want the ultimate for warmth and water resistance in snow caves and igloos buy yourself and ultralight event bivy sack instead. You don't the the gore-tex shell on your sleeping bag to be your last line of defense against a wet bag in those conditions. Get real dude.

Responded on

For anyone interested, here's what Western Mountaineering says about Gore Windstopper™ 830 Fabric:

"Our Gore Windstopper™ fabric, manufactured by W.L. Gore and Associates, is the most weather resistant/breathable fabric available and provides the ultimate protection against moisture and condensation. The face fabric is a 273 thread count 30 denier fabric that weighs 1.1 ounces per square yard. This is the lightest and most compressible Gore Windstopper™ fabric available and the one with the softest hand. After laminating, it's finished weight is about 1.7 oz. per yard. The breathability of the Gore Windstopper™ membrane reduces the threat of condensation while remaining plenty water resistant for the needs of a sleeping bag. Use Gore Windstopper™ sleeping bags in damp or extreme conditions to prevent moisture from reducing down performance. Some winter conditions may require the use of the Hot Sac™ vapor barrier liner to provide the most optimum performance."

http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=about&page=Product%20Details&ContentId=4#6

Responded on

Just a reply to Philip's post. I share your concerns about the breathability of fabrics, but Gore Windstopper is not the same as Gore-Tex. The PU laminate is NOT present, and this allows air and water vapor to pass. Gore Windstopper is totally windproof (unlike eVent), but due to the lack of the PU laminate, you don't need to develop a temperature and humidity gradient to allow moisture to pass. The GWS is a very acceptable compromise for water resistance and breathability. And it will save you weight over a eVent bivy. At the temperatures we are talking about, you don't need complete waterproofness.