Gear Review

5 5

Lightweight Durable Dry Stable Boot

I use these for short hikes without heavy packs, for quail and dove hunts in brushy country, and for field work conducting environmental studies. This is my second pair. The first pair lasted about five (or so) years.

They are just now splitting at the basal seams after they got accidentally soaked with diesel fuel in late 2009 on a long-term job. I finally got the diesel out of them with several heavy-duty hot water and detergent wash cycles, but the seams had already deteriorated somewhat due to the diesel oil. They actually still seemed water tight until the summer of 2010.

The Vibram type lug soles are now nearly worn out, so it is about time to replace the boots. The protective glued side material helped keep them together very well. I have had other cheaper made boots bust out the sidewalls in less than a year or two.

With the typical leather hiking boots, I usually struggle to keep them dry when regularly tracking through wet grass and brush - even with regular sno-seal. But, these lasted a long time before that happened and I didn't have to apply sno-seal - even after they became more like suede texture from the rocks and brush that rubbed against the outside.

I used to get full-grain leather hiking boots and pay about twice the price. They would usually only last two or three years before the welt started rotting out.

I play and work in Texas most of the year, so these lightly insulated Asolo boots were better than the more heavily insulated ones. My feet were dry but rarely felt hot - even in the summer.

Got a $110 price on the first pair and an $85 price on this pair. I believe they are well worth the price.

I tend to destroy boots pretty fast, so the five plus year lifetime of these Asolo FSN95 boots is impressive. Especially, when considering the diesel mess that shortened their life.