Free Shipping on Orders Over $50 - Some Exclusions Apply*
  • 1-800-409-4502

  • Live Chat with a Gearhead

  • 100% Guaranteed Returns

Gear Question

suitable for outdoors? tree climbing, not...

Posted on

suitable for outdoors? tree climbing, not rock.

thanks!

Responded on

Pete, I would consider this an "all purpose" rope and should be ok for your intended use.

Best Answer Responded on

I'm not really sure why the description is the way it is, however this is not considered a GYM Line. Sterling sells ropes specifically for that. This is just like any other none dry treated Evolution Kosmos series. The reason it is cheaper is because there is less dye in the colors. That's why its not as pretty! LOL! I own this rope along with many other Sterling's and this to me is a great starter rope but can do most anything you need it to.

Responded on

I'm not really sure why the description is the way it is, however this is not considered a GYM Line. Sterling sells ropes specifically for that. This is just like any other none dry treated Evolution Kosmos series. The reason it is cheaper is because there is less dye in the colors. That's why its not as pretty! LOL! I own this rope along with many other Sterling's and this to me is a great starter rope but can do most anything you need it to.

Responded on

I think it's important to make a distinction here. When people are saying "gym" rope, they may be referring to one of two things. I have been to gyms that allow you to bring your own rope in to lead routes. This would in fact be a terrific rope for that purpose. However, I have owned one and taken quite a few whips on it and it is a work horse. Quite possibly one of the most durable ropes I've owned. Don't believe the hype that you have to own a $280 rope to project harder routes. Your rope doesn't care how hard you climb, it'll catch you on 5.10b just as well as 5.13. Now, if you want a super smooth dry treated, bi-pattern Cadillac, go for it. I'm just saying this rope is durable, gives soft catches, handles ok, and is cheap. Now, for the other "gym rope". Gyms usually employ what are called semi-static ropes. They have more stretch than static ropes (which have virtually none) but significantly less dynamic elongation than typical dynamic ropes. So yes, there are specific top roping "gym ropes" and no, this isn't one of them.

Oh, and "dry ropes" are generally used for ice and alpine applications as the dry treatment keeps the rope from absorbing water, freezing, weakening and being very difficult to handle. If you are strictly rock climbing, the dry treatment will wear off your sheath rather quickly and unless you plan on climbing in the rain quite a bit, it's a feature you won't need.