Gear Question

One person commented that this is not truly...

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One person commented that this is not truly a 4 season tent. I'm looking for an 8 person (or larger) tent that will serve as home for a few months during potentially harsh Maine/Canadian winters. Anyone have experience with long term use of this tent in the middle of winter?

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Since this tent does have some mesh panels, it's not as hard core a 4 season tent like some of the expedition tents but it will endure all but severe winter conditions. Since you are going to spend a few months in it, be prepared for bouts of claustrophobia & boredom while sharing the premises with others.

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I like the 2 meter North Face 4 season tent. I spent 2 months in Jan an Feb in Rangley Maine. Pricy but worth it.

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I agree with you Mike Miller,that it's not a hardcore 4 season tent. I wouldn't want to depend on it like my North Face VE-25 (which has been used in expeditions in the Artic and Antartica), but the Flying Diamond will hold up very well, and hold in heat, in the unexpected snow/sleet/hail storms that I've faced in Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite (that was a nightime, 6 inch snow storm over a Memorial Day weekend), or the snow/sleet/hail storm I faced in Yellowstone last August (photo attached), or the snow storm/blizzard on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon year before last in early Oct., at 8,300'. Structurally it'll hold up, but there's too much uncoverable mesh in the tent to hold in body heat at temperatures below 10 degrees F., but I can attest that it's done very well at 25 degrees. I haven't tried it at temps near 10 degrees F yet (and I don't intend to), so that part is just my opinion.

I agree with you Mike Miller,that it's not a hardcore 4 season tent. I wouldn't want to depend on it like my North Face VE-25 (which has been used in expeditions in the Artic and Antartica), but the Flying Diamond will hold up very well, and hold in heat, in the unexpected snow/sleet/hail storms that I've faced in Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite (that was a nightime, 6 inch snow storm over a Memorial Day weekend), or the snow/sleet/hail storm I faced in Yellowstone last August (photo attached), or the snow storm/blizzard on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon year before last in early Oct., at 8,300'. Structurally it'll hold up, but there's too much uncoverable mesh in the tent to hold in body heat at temperatures below 10 degrees F., but I can attest that it's done very well at 25 degrees. I haven't tried it at temps near 10 degrees F yet (and I don't intend to), so that part is just my opinion.
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Answer is late, but I spent a lot of time in large car-camping tents. The best winter-performer I've found is called the Alaskan Guide tent made by another outfitter, and there is an 8-man version even though 8 men would be a tight fit. It's bomber, and it's geodesic. It's no Mountain Hardwear Stronghold, but it's easier on the wallet.