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Lodge Backpack - 1526 cu in

Quiksilver Lodge Backpack - 1526 cu in

$60.00

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Coin Backpack

Skullcandy Coin Backpack

$33.71 $44.95 25% Off

5

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Division Daypack

Skullcandy Division Daypack

$23.97 $39.95 40% Off

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How to Pick the Right Pack

There are a wide variety of differently sized packs with a seemingly endless array of features to suit any adventure needs. In general, packs can be broken down into three categories: daypacks, backpacking packs, and travel backpacks. Understanding the differences between each of these pack types can save you a lot of time and frustration when it's time to narrow down your choices.

Backpacking Packs
Whether it's an overnight trip or a two-week trek, you'll need a backpacking backpack. These technical packs are designed to help you carry heavy loads over long distances. Shop Backpacking Backpacks
Related Content Tips for Lightening Your Backpacking Load
Daypacks
Daypacks are small to medium sized packs designed to hold a single day's worth of gear for everything from hiking and backcountry skiing to mountain biking and cragging. Shop Daypacks Shop Technical Daypacks Shop Laptop Daypacks Shop School Backpacks
Travel Packs
If you're looking for an everyday pack to take on long flights, secure your laptop, or carry around campus, a travel pack is the right bag for the job. Shop Travel Backpacks

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How to Buy an Alpine Touring Boot

Free Your Feet From the Resort

Traditionally, a ski boot was designed for going downhill with as much speed and power as possible, with little thought to the comfort when going uphill. With an aggressive sole material like Vibram, lightweight shell material, and the now-standard lever to switch between walk and ski modes (to free the cuff to rotate or lock it in place), the alpine touring boot changed everything. This is the boot to take into the backcountry.

Binding Compatibility:

An alpine touring boot is either compatible with a standard alpine ski binding (DIN normalized binding), a TECH binding, or both. There’s little difference between the boots except for the extra heel and toe fittings required for a boot to be TECH compatible.

Flex Rating:

A stiff boot will have a high flex rating (120-130+), while a softer boot will have a lower flex rating (100-110). Stiffness benefits you during the descent, but it might cause you pain on the skin track—consider whether you prefer superior comfort or performance.

Weight:

A carbon cuff or tongue, lightweight plastic shell, minimalist buckle design, or honeycomb structure help reduce the weight of an AT boot so you can move faster and feel less fatigued during a long tour.