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The Alpine Trekker from Backcountry Access is the world's best selling ski touring adapter. That's not the biggest feat as it's the ONLY alpine touring adapter on the market. But that's not to diminish the quality or performance of these awesome tools. Alpine Trekkers adapt alpine bindings for touring by offering a releasable heel to facilitate climbing. Heel elevators, called Mega Climbers, facilitate steep climbing.
  • Fits boots Mondo size 22 and up

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Backcountry Access Alpine Trekker Adaptors

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Here's what others have to say...

why does this suggest using with regular...

Posted on

why does this suggest using with regular boots rather then AT boots? I am just getting into off piste and was planning on buying AT boots so if I choose to hike up some terrain it will be lighter and more comfortable.

Best Answer Responded on

These are made to work with Alpine bindings and boots. If you are looking for light weight then look on...

3 5

Used for 1 season

These are Adequate for the job.

You can pick them up cheap which is good. They get you into the backcountry which is good.

Yes it is another bit of gear to carry around and they aren't very light, but it gives you the opportunity to have fun! Work well w/ Salomon bindings. I had problems on my Look bindings w/ the big knob on the back bumping the trekkers.

If you want a downhill binder with some AT abilities there are other options especially now w the duke/gruardian/MFD's etc. If you only have a little cash and still want in the BC this is a great option and will get the job done.

1 5

Cheap material....not worth it

The metal is weak and bent super easily. Your boot also flops around everywhere. Spend the money and get the Marker AT bindings

do they work with rossi 140 xxl bindings

Posted on

do they work with rossi 140 xxl bindings

Responded on

Yes, but you would be better off with a binding without the tall heal piece like the XXL.

5 5

not with looks

These don't clear the heel piece on the look turn-table bindings. but these tankasourses are a blast.

3 5

AT Tracker

Look, I have a set of Securafix that would be 15 years old, still OK. The AT Trackers that I bought seem a little argicultural, the plastic spacers that are used for he cage adjustment are shit, the first time I put the screws in the plastic stripped, the the screws, kept spinning, which means either change the screws or loctite and never adjust again, a threaded insert is needed,...................it took me and hour to adjust them. Never give them to a friend or adjust them in the backcountry..................................................

4 5

going back to trekkers

I have had trekkers and marker dukes but nothing beats having good bindings on when your skiing down. Marker dukes are pretty high off the ski. Lifters under your bindings are a thing of the past. skinning up is much better with a true AT set up but whats the point if you ski like crap coming down.

3 5

They work well with a few bugs

Bought a pair of these for me and my son to do some front side skinning in bounds. He weighs 135 lbs I weigh 240 lbs. His bindings work flawlessly. Mine had some bugs; probably because of my size. I found in flat to moderate green terrain my trekkers tend to torque out of the ski binding. This did not occur on steeper terrain. This happens without the ski binding opening and can happen at the toe or heel. Also the screws holding the cage together backed out after one ascent and I had to tightening them. Good idea to bring tools with you. I solved this problem later by installing two three inch 8 / 32 stainless through bolts with marine style locking nuts to replace the self tapping screws. While the trekker looked to be the correct length I lengthened the trekker a bit more after the first tour. This increased the forward pressure the heel binding exerts and mostly solved my problem of the trekker coming out of the ski binding- it happens less frequently but still occurs if I am not careful to limit side or lateral forces. In general these devices don't like to go side ways or up a pitch with a double fall line as they don’t like lateral force. It is better to have your ski flat on the snow and "north and south" if you can visualize what I mean; the less lateral force exerted on the trekker, the better; again, probably due to my weight. A previous reviewer Seth pointed out the trekker is not ideal for high tail bindings. I have such a binding, Look PX 12 and Seth is correct. The boot hits the heel binding tail if the heel elevator is not deployed. With the elevator deployed the heel does not hit the binding tail. The highest heal elevator is adequate for most blue terrain. However a steep pitch will leave you feeling your heel needs more elevation especially if you are using traditional ski boots with limited forward flex. Although a pitch that makes you feel out of balance is going to be approaching a steepness that may not be “skin-able” without the aid of a crampon if conditions are icy. Over all they work as advertised- with a few bugs.

Do these fit with Look Pivot 18s and Salomon...

Posted on

Do these fit with Look Pivot 18s and Salomon Shogun Boots?

Responded on

They will work with your setup.

Responded on

I disagree with Dave. I never use them with my pivots. First off, when clipped in, the trekkers do not seem to fit quite right in the my Pivots. Secondly, Pivots are HEAVY and trekkers are HEAVY so do the math, heavy+heavy=miserable climb.

Would they work well with Look Pivot 14...

Posted on

Would they work well with Look Pivot 14 bindings?

Responded on

They are designed to work with any alpine binding.

Responded on

i would be careful with look and rossignol bindings as the heel piece comes up a little far and can interfere with heel motion while skinning.

Responded on

No. Do not use these with FKS bindings.

I am interested in flat terrain travel,...

Posted on

I am interested in flat terrain travel, not uphill. I go into the side country/out of bounds at resorts and sometimes have to traverse back. Would these be good for this (with skins on the skiis)?
What is the drawback if any of these "adapters" over full AT bindings?

Responded on

these are perfect for your use! the only drawback compare to a full AT binding is the convenience... otherwise these are great! BCA also makes crampons for the trekker for hard pack and ice.

What is the difference between the Alpine...

Posted on

What is the difference between the Alpine Trekker and the Alpine Trekker Junior?? I was told they were the same - just different color strap.

Responded on

Write your answer here...Junior model is ONLY for smaller boot; i.e. shorter boot sole length only

2 5

Please- Save yourself now and hit the back button...

Alpine Trekkers are obsolete. Please save yourself the hassle and money and buy a real AT binding. Sure they eventually do the job and you get to use your own burly bindings, however, the drawbacks far outweigh the benefits. First off, the trekkers take up so much time during a day of touring. Making laps is hard b/c you must take your skis off and the trekkers out of your bindings to ski down then pull them out of your pack and fiddle with them till they sit in your bindings right. Sounds easy, but the trekkers always put up a good fight. Second, they break. The heel piece on mine snapped the first day i skied them. Finally, if you ski Rossi binders or another binding with a really tall heel piece, dont even bother. the heel of your boot will come down on the heel piece of the binding and not let go all the way down to the 0 degreee position (major pain on long flats). The Day Wrekkers are no longer a necessity to get into the backcountry and a Fritschi, Duke, or MFD is a much better option.

Will these adapters work with Marker Griffon...

Posted on

Will these adapters work with Marker Griffon Bindings?

Best Answer Responded on

They will work with any alpine binding.

Do you take these off after the hike and...

Posted on

Do you take these off after the hike and ski down with them in your bag, or are you supposed to ski down on these???

Responded on

YOU TAKE THEM OFF, please for the love of god, do not attempt to ski down in these, they work so you can climb a hill in your downhill non-AT (alpine touring) gear!

You will need "skins" for your skis as well.

Do you take these off after the hike and...

Posted on

Do you take these off after the hike and ski down with them in your bag, or are you supposed to ski down on these???

Responded on

The definitely have to be collapsed to ski down. Matter of choice - see bindings - you may not have the same compatibility.

Responded on

YOU TAKE THEM OFF, please for the love of god, do not attempt to ski down in these, they work so you can climb a hill in your downhill non-AT (alpine touring) gear!

You will need "skins" for your skis as well.

4 5

These are great, with the right binding and a bit of work

These are a great solution if you have a good ski set-up you like and want to get into to the BC. There are some things you need to do right out of the box that will save you some major troubles. Number one being, make sure they fit your binding well, not just that they get in there but that they stay in there when you have a boot in them and are touring. I thought they fit great in my look PX12's but when you tour the toe of your ski boot pushes on the toe piece of the binding just enough to tweak them out in the heel. I also learned the first time I used them that the front screws that hole the rails your boot sits on are not in very good. 30 steps and the screw fell out and was gone, leaving me with one boot locked in to the regular binding and one in a trekker. Buy some red lock tight, or do what I did and JB weld the screws in, (when would you ever need to take them back out?). I now have them on some Marker Jesters and they hold superbly in them.

3 5

They are what they are

These are not a backcountry binding. They are not light. They do not tour well. They take up room in your pack. They're expensive. They are known as "Day Wreckers." And the list of complaints go on and on. However there is one thing that makes these stand out above everything else. YOU CAN USE YOUR DOWNHILL BINDINGS IN THE BACKCOUNTRY!!! For those of you that need to feel the reassurance of your 916s, p18s, etc. this is the ultimate bc accessory. You can tour wherever you want, and still have an awesome, reassuring ski down, hucking off anything you want, because you are using a super solid downhill binding while skiing down. I've never been on a long tour with these, and would never do that. But when skinning out to a booter, or for some short sidecountry action, this thing is the best out there, and there's nothing else like it.

3 5

They worked . . . for a minute

I got these and I was stoked to finally get into the backcountry with my friends. 300 meters later one of the main axle screws fell out leaving my ski dangling from my boot by one screw. So I clicked in to my binding regular alpine style and did a half and half maneuver. Which worked for a while till the strange torque I was putting on the one trekker caused it to twist and then it would not hold in my binding and then I was stuck shuffling up the rest of the way in my regular bindings while my trekkers hung useless off my back pack. I don't see why you would ever need to take that cage off so I bought some replacement screws from the hardware store (standard size 10-32 X 3/8) and some JB weld to make sure those screws never come out again. Now I feel like they will be great for many more adventures and would recommend everyone to at least put some lock-tight on those front screws before using them.

4 5

Alpine Trekkers not bad

I did a small tour with them and the Trekkers are not bad. I think they are best if you decide you would like to use more than one ski in the backcountry and you don't want to buy more than one randonee binding. They are a bit ackward on steeper terrain because you are higher up off the ski then you normally would be on a normal tour binding. My plan is to use the adaptors on my Gotama's and get a real tour binding for the Rossignol Scratch. If you are sticking to short tours then the adaptors are cool and cost effective. I had no trouble keeping up with the group I was with who had real tour bindings and they fit in my Dakine pack along with my skins, beacon, shovel and other clothing. The heel elevators help a lot going up hill. If you want to use more than one ski in the backcountry and save money on bindings, then the trekkers are worth it. I would definitely have in mind a real tour binding for another ski you have so you can do longer tours.

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