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Whether you're new to the touring scene or just want the performance and reliability of your alpine binding on gnarly descents, the Backcountry Access Alpine Trekker Adapters is the tool for you. A releasable heel facilitates climbing, while two adjustable climbing bars help initiate steep climbing so you don't end up wreaking havoc on your Achilles tendon.

  • Fits into standard alpine bindings; for ascent use only
  • Climbing Bar Height: 1.25in (3.2cm); 1.75in (4.5cm)
  • Sizing: 240-355mm (one size fits all)
  • Ski crampon attachment (not included)

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Backcountry Access Alpine Trekker Adapters

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Here's what others have to say...

3 5

Works

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Not really what you want to take into the backcountry but works well for basic things. I use it to skin up easy slopes or after the mountains close for the season.

4 5

They'll get you up there...

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've been on the same pair of trekkers for a few seasons now and they are still holding up. Though they aren't quite as convenient as today's AT bindings, they will get you to the top and then you have the reward of shredding your line in your trusty alpine bindings. They may be a little outdated, but if you're primarily doing short tours or sidecountry shred, they will get it done. There's a reason they aren't extinct...

1 5

Junk

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

What a disappointment. Every time i have gone out with these something on them has broken. I picked up a pair of these to just mess around and see if i was going to like alpine touring and all they have done has made me frustrated. I have just been going in the hills around Pittsburgh and thankfully that is as far as i have gone because i have had to walk part of every trip. I managed to find a pair on sale for $75 and now i know why. Save the money and get a real pair of bindings.

4 5

Great Beginner Binding

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have used these for a few seasons now and have been a great alternative compared to buying a more expensive tour binding. I got these on Ebay for $50, well worth it. I have had the back plastic piece break on me which is inconvenient, but not a deal breaker. I have also had them popping out of my bindings when turning or putting a lot of pressure from the side, which isn't always a consistent thing. Take note mine are an older model.
I don't regret getting these.

4 5

They are what they are...

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have had a pair of these for about 4 years now (too broke for touring bindings) and they have always worked fine. They have the most issues side-hilling, as they do not have the best torsional rigidity. Sometimes they can be a bit funky on kick turns as well. I lost one screw from mine, and once I realized this decided to epoxy them all in place. I can never adjust them from a 28.5, but the chances of them falling apart on me have been drastically reduced. It is nice to take these off and step into a 16 DIN alpine binding for the way down. These are a great option if you do not have the money to invest in a pair of touring bindings or are just starting to get into AT. With a little care they will take you a long way...

It should be noted that they do not work super well with FKS bindings, the turntable heel does not allow them to go fully down, so it is kind of like walking with the riser up all the time. They seem to work the best with Salomon STH type bindings, or the Atomic version, or anything with a similar heel piece.

5 5

Great entry point

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

My first foray into the BC was on a early pair of these decades ago. 1/2 Pricey now compared to Dynafits Speeds. But for anyone wanting to try it out in the BC on Alpine boots/bindings you shouldn't hesitate. I used these for a week at Rogers Pass in Salomon alpine boots and bindings and and never knew the difference. The fun was on the down anyway. Easy jump into the BC fun!

Trekkers In a Marker Binding

Posted on

Responded on

Great video. Do you know how it will work with rossignol axial xxl bindings?

Responded on

They should work with just about any DIN binding. They attach to your boots much like a pair of crampons would and then fit into the binding based on your outsole size. Its not perfect but it works.

3 5

Take care of them, they take care of you

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

My first day on these was a disaster. One broke after 20m of skinning. I kept going with just one. Then that one broke a few hours later. I have since got them dialed to work very well. Here is what you do. First thing before anything is DON'T USE THEM IN LOOK/ROSSIGNOL BINDINGS. They are amazing in marker jesters. Second. Before your first tour glue the front screws that hold the pivot point in. I cannot imagine why you would ever need to take this off. So I JB welded mine on. This is what broke 20m into my first tour and I lost the screw. In the 3 years since I have glued them they have worked fine. Also extent the part that goes into the binding as big as you can still fit it in so that it pushes the heel peice back so you don't hit it with the heel of your boot when you step down. So they work, kinda. Just keep an eye one them. Tour with duct tape, extra screws, and super glue. And they will be just fine

Responded on

Hi,

I was just wondering why you shouldn't use them in Look bindings (I assume this means the Pivot line?)?

Responded on

Hi step,
Because of the way the toe piece is shaped when you stride forward the toe of your boot hits the toe piece and torques the whole trekker in the binding. for me this meant after an hour and half of skinning the part of the trekker that goes into the binding had twisted so that it would not stay in the binding and kept releasing. I now used them with a pair of jesters and they work perfectly. I'll try to post a photo in a few days so you can see

Responded on

Good info Matt; Can we assume the same issues with the Salomon Driver toe?

Responded on

I would assume but I am not certain since I don't have Salomons so I have no experience with them. I will take some pics tonight and get them up like I said I would, your question reminded me I have yet to do that

Responded on

I decided videos are the wave of the future and much easier than posting a million photos and trying write all the info down

Responded on

They work fine with Salomons.

4 5

If you can't afford a whole new binding

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have toured on these for a couple seasons (someday I'll be able to afford a touring binding) and they get the job done as long as you're careful with them. They are not going to kick turn like an alpine touring binding will so be careful on those switchback skin tracks. All in all though, they have got me where I wanted to go.
My recommendation would be to make them slightly larger than they need to be so that the binding will lock them in real tight.

3 5

cheap alternative to touring bindings

I used these for a season when I started touring and they are a good and cheap alternative to touring bindings for the aspiring backcountry skier.

Responded on

right on!

1 5

Day Wreckers,...

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

These were good back in the 90's, they way out of date know, spend your more more wisely. If you want something get Marker or Salomon Guardians. If you want your DAY WRECKED buy these, if you want the ability to do some skinning/touring get Dukes or Guardians. If you want to get serious get a Dynafit setup. I have not used these in over seven year, but I still remember how badly they sucked.

Responded on

i'd assume they have updated their technology over the last 7 years. my buddy likes em; only complaint is the height off the ski, which makes traverses/hikes a bit wobbly

2 5

Cheaper, but not worth it.

After contemplating buying these and coming close a few times I am really glad I didn't. At around $150 they seem like a smarter alternative to some of the other more expensive touring bindings, but spend the money and get a solid touring binding, one you can trust on all types of terrain.

Responded on

So you haven't tried them, and you are leaving a bad review based on speculation?!?!?

Responded on

Just looking at these vs AT bindings & you don't need to try them. I had them 10 years ago. Dukes/Guardians are WAY BETTER options. Start using them & you'll call them Day Wreckers, I'm surprised BCA they still produce & sell these this POS touring setup.

4 5

Compromise

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I bought these to use for a 3 day backcountry class and I wasn't sure that I wanted to invest heavily in new gear for (potentially) a single trip. Reading through the other reviews, I can just as easily apply the positives and negatives to my experience. Set up was easy and pretty intuitive. Traveling on flats or directly up the fall line was easy enough, but traversing and side stepping were very difficult. There was too much play between the boot-trekker-binding to set a really solid edge with them on.
They pack up nice and small. They're not as light as a rando set up, but skis, bindings, trekkers were lighter than a friend's designated backcountry set up.
My biggest problem wasn't with the trekkers directly, but with the stiffness of my boots and the inability to really flex forward onto my toes for a more natural gate.

5 5

Awesome

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

they work great.

4 5

These work well for me...

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I get out about 20 days a year in the BC and these work great once you set them up properly. I've never had an issue with them coming out of the binding of off the boot. Once I got a bit of a system down they are quick and easy to get on and off. They aren't a replacement for a solid AT boot/binding but they work very well for an occasional BC skier like me who doesn't want to drop huge $ for a dedicated setup.

5 5

worked perfectly

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

This wil not replace real touring bindings but this wil definitely help if you want to do few days of backcountry skiing and don't want to spend over $1,000 in new skis and touring bindings. I just went to Canada and used the Alpine Trekkers. They really did the job very well. The other alternative was to carry the skis and wear snowshoes but I preferred my Trekkers with skinns. The initial setup is super easy. After that, it takes 2 seconds to install and remove. They are pretty light considering how strong they need to be. They pack pretty small too. I had a great experience with them. I was happy not to use snowshoes and carry my skis.

worked perfectly
Responded on

may i ask your height and weight? did you have trouble with sidestepping and traverses?

Responded on

Jeff has it right, sidesteping & kickturns are the Achile's Heel of this sad excuse for alpine touring options.

Responded on

right on...some unfair comments here comparing modern tech gear. They do what they are suppose to and do it well enough.

1 5

Save your money and buy touring bindings

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I originally bought trekkers because I wanted to use an alpine binding when skiing BC. Don't do that. Trekkers are horrible and the touring experience is guaranteed to put a black memory in the best of days. I was pysched to sell them on Craigslist.

Responded on

We call them 'Day Wreckers' for a good reason.

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