Lightweight InsulationLightweight Insulation

Description

Lightweight tent; swift setup.

The Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 2-Person 3-Season Tent provides durable protection in a lightweight, no-hassle design. With just one DAC Featherlite NSL three-branched pole (made with an eco-friendly anodizing process) and DAC aluminum twist clips, this one-door tent sets up easily, packs down small, and comes in with a trail weight of close to two pounds.

  • Waterproof fly, floor, and taped seams keep you dry
  • Covered vestibule protects your gear and gives you more floor space
  • Mesh body provides ventilation and reduces condensation
  • All Big Agnes tents feature poles made with DAC's Green Anodizing process, which eliminates the chemical polishing stage, reduces the need for hazardous chemicals, and recycles water throughout the rinsing process
  • Three interior mesh pockets organize odds and ends
  • Reflective guy lines prevent injuries at night
  • Rain fly combines with poles and footprint (footprint sold separately) for an ultralight, fast-pitch setup
  • Optional gear loft (sold separately) provides extra storage space

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Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 Tent: 2-Person 3-Season

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Here's what others have to say...

on the scale

on the scale

Posted on

1178grams=41.5oz all-in

Responded on

NO one should be complaining about this weight. Great tent and at a little over 2 lbs. it's barely noticeable in a pack.

Good storage

Good storage

Posted on

Mesh top pocket refracts light from headlamp. Good place for my GPS beacon to get signal.

5 5

Shines in less than ideal conditions

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

We ended up in a crappy camp site and this was the best place to pitch the tent. I've used this tent a ton and love it, and agree with a lot of the positive reviews here. What I wanted to point out is that because it's such a roomy tent for 1 person, it is very forgiving when you can't pitch it perfectly. For the record, I spent 4 hours in a heavy rain with water running under the tent. I could see the water underneath when I pressed on the tent floor...it's sort of translucent. I was perfectly dry. And very bored.

Shines in less than ideal conditions
4 5

A slightly oversized UL1

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

This tent is nearly identical to the Fly Creek UL1, the exceptions being its slightly heavier weight and its increase in interior space. Given the weight difference (7oz) some people may prefer this tent to the UL1.

Its always annoyed me that this tent is advertised as freestanding. Will it stand up on its own without being staked? Yes. Do you have all the interior room if you don't? No. The tripod pole does not create structure for the foot end of the tent. You will have to stake it out in order to do so.

My other complaint is that the low angle for the foot end of the tent really makes it a tiny tent for anyone taller than 5'10" or so.

Other than those two complaints its a very nice tent. Light weight, well designed. Its a little more spacious than the UL1, which will provide for space for a friend, partner, or for your pack if the weather gets interesting.

My other minor gripe is the end entry. I'm 6'2" and an end entry tent is a real pain. My current tent is a Mountain Hardwear Supermega UL2. Great tent, for the most part, but I just hate the end entry. Side entry tents are far more convenient and comfortable to enter and exit, but are slightly heavier.

I have a few favorite two person tents. I love the MSR Hubba Hubba (side entry and bombproof, but a little heavy), the Mountain Hardwear Supermega UL2 (annoying end entry, but very lightweight), and the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 (side entry, lighter than the Hubba Hubba but heavier than the Supermega). In my opinion all those tents are better than this tent. That's not to disparage this tent, its good. But for the price there are better tents with more specific advantages.

What is the definition of "Trail Weight"?...

Posted on

What is the definition of "Trail Weight"?

Best Answer Responded on

Trail weight is the minimum weight of the tent . It only includes the tent body, rain fly, and poles. It doesn't include your footprint, stakes, or guy lines. Thinking practically, your tent will weight somewhere between the trail and packed weight, depending on what gets packed.

4 5

Super light Super easy

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is a great solo or solo plus dog tent. You can squeeze 2 adults in it but you better like them alot. I can set it up with 8 stakes and feel pretty confidant it will with stand most weather.

Responded on

I was able to use this during some rain recently. The dog and I were stuck in there for about 2 hours mid day. My dog was quite restless and I was very nervous about the material. He didn't do any damage. The material is very light but stronger than expecetd.

5 5

A great tent for bike touring

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I bought the Fly Creek 2 for a self contained solo cross country bicycle trip. Just me and my bike (and everything I needed in 4 panniers.
The first 20 days of the tour had measurable rain so I got to experience the rain resistance. The only leak was where the tag was sewn in the fly and that was limited to a few drops in a hard driving rain. I did not have a problem with water coming into the tent when entering and leaving as you do not have to unzip the vestibule to the top to exit or enter.
I purchased it because of the light weight, and small packed size. I wanted to be able to pack the tent poles in my panniers and the 19 inch poles fit nicely in my rear panniers.
I used the UJ-2 as a one person plus gear tent so did not have problems with the single door. I could fit the 4 panniers, handle bar bag and myself in without any problems.

A great tent for bike touring
5 5

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 Review

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I bought the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 for backpacking and it definitely lives up to its name. It is a "2 person tent" in so much as two adults can cram into it. It is great for couples and single backpackers. For two friends trying to share a tent, I would not recommend this tent. The UL3 fits that function well.

The material is thin but surprisingly durable, however care is warranted. With any sort of material this light, I think it's unreasonable to wear on it hard and expect it to last forever. The UL2 needs to be treated fairly delicately in terms of unzipping, set up, and what not, in order to last.

For the tent to really last, you have to get the footprint or use an adequately sized tarp underneath. The base material is tough but will tear on rocks or other rough material with enough stress. With the footprint, it's golden, so factor this into your purchase decision.

PROS:
SUPER lightweight - weighs 2.15OZ with footprint.
Wind and rain resistant to a surprising degree.
Sets up and breaks down very quickly.
Fairly spacious for one person.

CONS:
Condensation collects a little bit on the inside of the vestibule.
Not adequate for 2 adults unless you are OK with being packed like sardines. Not adequate for colder-weather camping.
Has to be completely staked out to generate the maximum amount of possible room inside the tent.

If you are going camping and plan to sleep on a rock surface, this tent will not be what you want as staking the guy lines is crucial to maximizing the interior space of the tent.

Overall, I still am happy to give this tent 5 stars because it does exactly what is advertised - it's an ultra light backpacking tent that is no frills and gets it done. If you want a tent you can abuse, it's not going to weigh under 3 pounds until newer materials are developed. It keeps my pack light and the bugs from crawling on me!

Comparison between this tent and the...

Posted on

Comparison between this tent and the mountain hardwear supermega UL -2p 3 Season. My main concern is that when open, the peak of the fly over the door may result in rain dripping into the B.A. tent through the door and that the need to steak out the foot of the B.A tent may limit it's versatility in campsite selection. Can anybody address these concerns?

Responded on

You're absolutely right having that concern regarding the front door. The ridgepole does not extend past the front door which will definately cause water to come into the tent when entering and leaving. The Mountain hardwear Supermega UL has poles that extend beyond the door which means water will stay out. Definately something to consider if you're planning on spending a lot of time in rainy weather. You should also checkout Outdoorgearlab.com's reviews on this tent. It confirms everything that you were concerned about. The picture below is from that site that compares both tents you were asking about. Hope this is helpful.

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Backpacking-Tent-Reviews

You're absolutely right having that concern regarding the front door. The ridgepole does not extend past the front door which will definately cause water to come into the tent when entering and leaving. The Mountain hardwear Supermega UL has poles that extend beyond the door which means water will stay out. Definately something to consider if you're planning on spending a lot of time in rainy weather. You should also checkout Outdoorgearlab.com's reviews on this tent. It confirms everything that you were concerned about. The picture below is from that site that compares both tents you were asking about. Hope this is helpful.  <br/>  <br/> http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Backpacking-Tent-Reviews
Responded on

I've never really seen too much rain drip in past the zipper garage on my BA tent, but it does get in. I can definitely see the value in the extended eaves on the Supermega. You not only get that bit of overhang, but the angles look like they would be better to drain the water down and away. With the BA tents in this style, no staking = no vestibule at all. It's also a reach to get to the fly's door zipper without crawling out of the tent and across the bare ground a little. Except for a few times when I've been crammed in on a ledge or in a boulder field and needed to guy out fully for rain or wind, not particularly limiting on site selection, but then again, in all fairness, under those conditions, any lack of site space is going to limit what you can do to hunker in properly with any tent. I will add: this and say the Seedhouse 2 are narrow. It's not so much the floor area itself, although it's right there with 2 people, it's the steep angle going up that closes down on you really fast functionally and psychologically. That works in terms of less overall area needed to set up, but it's a drag with only 1 end door and 2 people. You regularly get a face full of ass and lots of climbing over each other.

Responded on

That's why I go solo tent or hammock. Sounds like you better REALLY like who you're backpacking with.

Responded on

Ha! Three days in and there's nobody I like that much...just kills the hell out of the niceties like red LEDs when you're smelling them and getting kicked in the head simultaneously.

what is the difference between trail weight...

Posted on

what is the difference between trail weight and packed weight? Also; backcountry, can we get a "weight selection" in addition to cost, size, season etc on the side bar?

Best Answer Responded on

Packed weight refers to the amount of weight that is in the tent package when you buy it. It contains stakes, tent, guylines, footprint (if included) etc. Trail weight is used to refer to a minimal amount of items needed to set the tent up. This could be less stakes, guylines, extra packaging. Fast pitched weight refers to just the rainfly, poles, and footprint. Hope this helps.

Responded on

See my 4/4/13 review, below, for more detail on actual component weights. I'm a tenth-of-an-ounce counter and have been really frustrated in past about vague tent specs. Big Agnes - who does a better job than most in providing weight info - has the following definitions in their tent FAQ section:

- Packed weight: This is the heaviest you can expect your tent to weigh, straight out of the box or from the store. This weight refers to all packaging, hang tags, as well as the stuff sacks, fly, body, stakes, poles, and guy lines.

- Trail weight: This is the lightest you can expect your tent to weigh, stripped of everything but the essentials. This number reflects the weight of just the fly (no guy lines), body, and poles.

- Fast-fly weight: This is the weight of your fly, footprint and poleset only.

Do we really need the weight of tent with "hang tags" or plastic packaging? Don't we want to know what the "Trail Weight" is with stakes? How about if we want to pack tent components that we may actually need if we run into a stormy night in the mountains (like guy cords and stakes)? C'mon tent makers!

Pic shows 0.75 oz worth of guy cords (so light... so useful...)

See my 4/4/13 review, below, for more detail on actual component weights.  I'm a tenth-of-an-ounce counter and have been really frustrated in past about vague tent specs.  Big Agnes - who does a better job than most in providing weight info - has the following definitions in their tent FAQ section: <br/>  <br/>  - Packed weight: This is the heaviest you can expect your tent to weigh, straight out of the box or from the store. This weight refers to all packaging, hang tags, as well as the stuff sacks, fly, body, stakes, poles, and guy lines. <br/>  <br/> - Trail weight: This is the lightest you can expect your tent to weigh, stripped of everything but the essentials. This number reflects the weight of just the fly (no guy lines), body, and poles. <br/>  <br/> - Fast-fly weight: This is the weight of your fly, footprint and poleset only.  <br/>  <br/> Do we really need the weight of tent with "hang tags" or plastic packaging?  Don't we want to know what the "Trail Weight" is with stakes?  How about if we want to pack tent components that we may actually need if we run into a stormy night in the mountains (like guy cords and stakes)?  C'mon tent makers! <br/>  <br/> Pic shows 0.75 oz worth of guy cords (so light... so useful...)
Responded on

Agreed. I would also like a feature like "tents under 2lbs" or "tents under 3lbs," "packs under 3lbs" etc....

Responded on

You guys are right. It should be "realistic minimum weight"...what it actually takes.

I know that to pitch this tent anywhere near correctly, including in fast-pitch, you need 9 stakes and at least 3-4' of guy line. Especially with the shell, if you don't stake the 4 corners, the vestibule, and the 2 side and 1 back end guys, you're either getting rain come in the sides, you have no vestibule, or the condensation is going to be a real problem because you don't have enough separation in the fly and shell.

I'm not picking on BA at all...they all do it. It's largely a false standard. I'm just not particularly so minimalistic that even when I'm being weight conscious, watching my tent get blown down the valley or me being soaking wet all night is what I define as the purpose of a functional "shelter". Why carry and worry about tent weight at all if that's how it's going to go? Might as well just use a bivy.

5 5

Awesome tent!

Seriously great tent! Incredibly light weight and packable. The pole system is so easy to set up. Rain fly goes on easily, and the whole setup pitches taught. The quick pitch option with the rain fly and floor print is awesome in nice weather!

5 5

Great tent!

Bought this specifically for it's extremely light weight and packing ability. Used it twice now on back country biking trips. Comfortable for two adults or one adult and two small children. Easy to set up with poles to snap together quickly with no chance of error. Stake down tent first then assemble poles; clip tent to poles; fly has clips and stake lines easy to match up. Strong against the wind. Small but functional vestibule. Zippers seem delicate and fabric is strong but thin; I'll be careful not to stress the zipper, screens or fabric. Love it!

Responded on

Are you a dwarf?

Fly Creek UL2

Posted on

pretty decent video description of the tent.

4 5

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 for Solo Trips

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I bought my Fly Creek UL2 specifically for solo trips. This 2-person tent is nearly as light as some bivy sacks and is lighter than most solo tents. Here's component weights as measured on my scale (accurate to within 0.05 oz):

14.1 oz - tent canopy
11.5 oz - rain fly w/ guy cords
10.2 oz - pole
4.40 oz - (11) stakes
0.60 oz - tent stuff sack
0.40 oz - pole stuff sack
0.20 oz - stake stuff sack

Subtotal weight = 41.4 oz (2 lbs, 9.4 oz). I also add in a custom 6.10 oz Tyvek footprint and total weight = 47.5 oz (2 lbs, 15.5 oz).

This tent certainly fits the bill for a solo tent. I'm 6.0" x 175 lbs and have no problem stretching out without touching foot or head of the tent's 86" length. I easily have room in tent for my pack, though it could also go in the vestibule with my boots. I wouldn't "buddy-up" in the Fly Creek UL2 unless it was my girlfriend... and if she were along I'd use my Mountain Hardwear Skyledge 3 anyway (see my separate review of that excellent tent). I only have two small gripes (and a one star deduction): 1. I prefer side doors to "end" doors (I'm sure Big Agnes designed tent with end door to minimize weight and maximize vestibule); 2. Tent could use an "eyebrow" pole to help get tent walls more vertical / more taught (tent does have a system of guys and clips for that purpose but a small, dedicated pole would work better).

If you're looking for a small, light, 3-season personal shelter, this tent is recommended.

Pic shows tent in use in the backcountry in Iowa's Ledges State Park.

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 for Solo Trips
5 5

Phenomenal lightweight tent

Great tent for backpacking at just over 2lbs. Packs small, not taking much space in your pack. Recommended for nicer weather, nothing too cold.

Does the big Agnes fly creek ul2 come with...

Posted on

Does the big Agnes fly creek ul2 come with stacks?

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

Posted on

Great tent here is a video demonstrating the features found on the Fly Creek UL2.

5 5

Fantastic Tent!

  • Gender: Female
  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I bought this after seeing it in use in the Tetons. It packs light enough for me (5'3") to carry alone yet is roomy enough for a companion as well. I am excited to put it to the test on my own!

4 5

Lightweight and packs tiny!

When my backpacking partner whipped this thing out and quickly pitched it I was really impressed. Then I went to grab the fly to put on it and I couldn't believe how light it was. It felt like nothing compared to standard rainflys on 2 person tents. We were two females under 5'5 and it was a cozy fit for both of us, not really room for both to sit up, but that's ok when you have a tent this light and compact. I found this to have some condensation issues as the majority of the walls next to your sleeping bag is not mesh, so I woke up with a partially soaked bag every morning, but I guess that also depends on other factors like the season and environment you are camped in (October, cold, camping by a lake in the Sierras). Anyways when it came down to breaking down camp for the hike out, my jaw dropped again on how tiny this thing packed down to. It packed down to half the size of the tent I own which is only 1 lb more than this. Its no wonder that my friend said its ok if she carried the entire thing rather than splitting up the tent parts to make our pack weights distributed equally. Usually before I go out if the weather outlook is really good, I won't bring a tent at all for weekend trips in the Sierras and just sleep outside on my pad, but I feel like this tent is an ideal choice for the Sierras where torrential rain and wind isn't the general rule. I have to admit I am a little skeptical on how it would hold up in harsher conditions.

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