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SB 20 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down - Women's

Kelty SB 20 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down - Women's

$299.95

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Col MemBrain Sleeping Bag:  -20 Degree Down

Marmot Col MemBrain Sleeping Bag: -20 Degree Down

$668.95

5 5 (9)

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Plasma 30 Sleeping Bag:30 Degree Down

Marmot Plasma 30 Sleeping Bag:30 Degree Down

from $468.95

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King Solomon Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down

Big Agnes King Solomon Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down

$449.95

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Day Hike Footwear and Backpacks

Ignite 20/EN 16 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down

Kelty Ignite 20/EN 16 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down

$219.95

5 5 (2)

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Deer Park Sleeping Bag: 30 Degree Down

Big Agnes Deer Park Sleeping Bag: 30 Degree Down

$249.95

5 5 (2)

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SB 20 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down

Kelty SB 20 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down

from $299.95

4 5 (1)

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Xenon Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down - Women's

Marmot Xenon Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down - Women's

$418.95

5

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Ignite 20 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down - Women's

Kelty Ignite 20 Sleeping Bag: 20 Degree Down - Women's

$219.95

5

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Furnace Sleeping Bag: 5 Degree Down

The North Face Furnace Sleeping Bag: 5 Degree Down

from $208.95

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Meteor Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down

Marmot Meteor Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down

from $298.95

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Teton Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down - Women's

Marmot Teton Sleeping Bag: 15 Degree Down - Women's

from $278.95

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Gamma Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Down

Marmot Gamma Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Down

from $398.95

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How to Choose a Down Sleeping Bag

Down sleeping bags use duck or goose down, the fluffy feathers birds use for insulation. As of yet, no made-made fiber has matched the warmth-to-weight ratio of down. Compressible and lightweight, down is the choice for traveling small and light. Look for the EN, or European Norm, rating. This industry-wide standard gives you an idea of the lowest temperature at which a bag will keep you warm.

Down
Down bags have a fill rating that indicates the amount of volume one ounce of down occupies. The higher the fill-rating, the loftier the down. It provides more warmth with less weight. Shop 30 to 55 Degree Down Sleeping Bags Shop 5 to 29 Degree Down Sleeping Bags Shop -40 to 4 Degree Down Sleeping Bags
Shape
Mummy-shaped bags taper towards your feet to reduce volume and hold warmth closer to your body. These bags can feel restrictive to some. A semi-rectangular bag can offer more room to move.
Related Content How to Choose the Right Camping Sleep System
Moisture Management
Down insulates less when wet. Some bags feature hydrophobic treatments on the outer fabric or on the down itself (like DriDown) to keep the down insulation dry.
Related Content How to Take Care of Your Sleeping Bag

How to Choose an Alpine Ski Boot

The Main Line of Communication Between You and Your Skis

 

In contrast to an alpine touring or telemark boot, an alpine boot is designed almost entirely around resort-based and inbounds skiing. Honestly assess your ability level and your interests before you start shopping for a boot. Ability level and interests dictate where and what you ski, and ultimately, the type of boot you’ll need. When choosing a ski boot, pay attention to fit, flex, and last width. These factors will help you maximize the likelihood of finding a well-fitting boot without stepping foot in a store. Secondary considerations, such as liner, buckle configuration strap, footbed, and boot sole features will come later in the buying process.

Fit:

A boot that fits well will hold your foot firmly and encourage ample control, circulation, and reduce the chance of blister-causing heel slippage. Ski boots come in a variety of lengths, measured in Mondo sizing (insole length in centimeters), forefoot widths (measured in millimeters), and cuff height and width (based on gender or manufacturer).

Flex:

Flex refers to how hard it is to flex the boot forward. Aggressive or heavier skiers will want a stiff boot (120-130+) to handle high speeds and arduous terrain. Beginners or smaller skiers best to start with a softer boot (80-100) and intermediate skiers may prefer a boot with a flex around (100-110).

Interest:

Alpine boots come in three flavors: park and pipe, alpine touring, and alpine. Park boots tend to be a little softer and more forgiving, alpine touring boots are made with lighter materials and offer a walk mode, and alpine boots balance performance and comfort for skiing inbounds at the resort.